GV TOP 5: Family Com Games

We’re back with another GV Top 5, this time we go back to our childhood and list our Top 5 Family Computer (Nintendo Entertainment System) games! Here are the results via our FB group (GudVibes Store).

5. Bomberman (1983)

Bomberman (ボンバーマン Bonbāman?) is an arcade-style maze-based video game developed by Hudson Soft. The original home computer game Bomber Man (爆弾男 Bakudan Otoko?) was released in 1983 for the MSX, NEC PC-8801, NEC PC-6001, Sharp MZ-700 and FM-7 in Japan, and a censored version for the MSX and ZX Spectrum in Europe as Eric and the Floaters. It had a Japanese sequel known as 3-D Bomberman, in which Bomberman navigates the maze in the first-person. In 1985, Bomberman was released for the Family Computer. It spawned the long-running series with many installments building on its basic gameplay. The earlier game Warp & Warp by Namco is most likely the inspiration for theBomberman gameplay.

4. Galaga (1981)

Galaga (ギャラガ Gyaraga?) is a fixed shooter arcade game developed and published by Namco in Japan and published byMidway in North America in 1981. It is the sequel to Galaxian, released in 1979. The gameplay of Galaga puts the player in control of a spacecraft which is situated at the bottom of the screen. At the beginning of each stage, the area is empty, but over time, enemy aliens will arrive in formation, and once all of the enemies arrive on screen, they will come down at the player’s ship in formations of one or more and may either shoot it or collide with it. During the entire stage, the player may fire upon the enemies, and once all enemies are vanquished, the player will proceed to the next stage.
Galaga is one of the most successful games from the Golden Age of Video Arcade Games. The arcade version of it has been ported to many consoles, and it has had several sequels.

3. Contra (1987)

Contra (Japanese: 魂斗羅 Hepburn: Kontora?) is a video game series produced by Konami composed primarily of run and gun-style shoot-’em-ups. The series debuted in 1987 as a coin-operated arcade game simply titled Contra, which was followed by the release of Super Contra in 1988 and several sequels produced for various home platforms.
The in-universe use of the term “Contra” is first explained within the Japanese instruction card of the arcade version ofContra, and reiterated in most games (including Contra: Shattered Soldier), as “a title awarded to a superior soldier possessing almost super human drive and ability, while excelling in guerrilla tactics”.
In Japanese, the title is spelled with the kanji characters 魂斗羅 or Kontora. This is a form of ateji, in which the characters are used for their phonetic pronunciations rather than any inherent meaning they may have.
The arcade version of Contra was released on February 1987, a few months after the Iran–Contra affair was made public. While it is unclear whether the game was deliberately named after the Nicaraguan Contra rebels, the ending theme of the original game was titled “Sandinista” (サンディニスタ Sandinisuta?), after the adversaries of the real-life Contras.

2. Super Mario Bros. (1985)

Super Mario Bros. (Japanese: スーパーマリオブラザーズ Hepburn: Sūpā Mario Burazāzu?) is a 1985 platform video gameinternally developed by Nintendo R&D4 and published by Nintendo as a pseudo-sequel to the 1983 game Mario Bros. It was originally released in Japan for the Family Computer on September 13, 1985, and later that year for the Nintendo Entertainment System in North America and Europe on May 15, 1987, and Australia later in 1987. It is the first of the Super Mario series of games. In Super Mario Bros., the player controls Mario and in a two-player game, a second player controls Mario’s brother Luigi as he travels through the Mushroom Kingdom in order to rescue Princess Toadstool from the antagonistBowser.
In 2005, IGN’s poll named the “pioneering” and “highly influential” title as the “greatest game of all time”, considering it to have aided in resurrecting the crashed American video game market of the 1980s. The game’s mid-1980s release served to further popularize the side-scrolling subgenre of the already popular platform video game genre of the early 1980s. In addition to its definitive features, the game has also sold enormously well, and was the best-selling game of all time for a single platform for approximately three decades at over 40 million units, until Nintendo’s Wii Sports took that title. The commercial success of Super Mario Bros. has caused it to be ported to almost every one of Nintendo’s major gaming consoles. Nintendo released special red variants of the Wii and Nintendo DSi XL consoles in re-packaged, Mario-themed, limited edition bundles in late 2010 as part of the 25th anniversary of the game’s release.

1. Circus Charlie (1984)

Circus Charlie (サーカスチャーリー Sākasu Chārī?) is an action/platform game originally released by Konami in which the player controls a clown named Charlie. The game was a hit arcade game in 1984, which also had a successful release on the MSX in 1984, followed by ports to the Nintendo Famicom in 1986 by Soft Pro and the Commodore 64 in 1987. It was released along with other Konami classic games on the Nintendo DS compilation Konami Classics Series: Arcade Hits.
Gameplay :
In the game there are six regular stages (plus an extra stage) of differing tasks that are to be completed by Charlie. Grabbingmoney bags, performing dangerous tricks, avoiding enemies, completing stages, etc., earns Charlie points. After the sixth stage is completed, the game starts over again but with a faster pace and more difficult (but exactly the same in terms of task to be completed) levels.
Charlie also races against time. Bonus points are awarded according to the time remaining, but running out of time will cost the player a life.
Results via our FB Group : GudVibes Store , Join us for our next feature! Keep Gaming!
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